About Tàijíquán

T’ai chi ch’uan or tàijíquán

T’ai chi ch’uan or tàijíquán is an internal Chinese martial art practiced for both its defense training and its health benefits. Though originally conceived as a martial art, it is also typically practiced for a variety of other personal reasons: competitive wrestling in the format of Pushing Hands (Tui Shou), demonstration competitions, and achieving greater longevity. As a result, a multitude of training forms exist, both traditional and modern, which correspond to those aims with differing emphasis. Some training forms of t’ai chi ch’uan are especially known for being practiced with relatively slow movements.

Today, t’ai chi ch’uan has spread worldwide. Most modern styles of t’ai chi ch’uan trace their development to at least one of the five traditional schools: Chen, Yang, Wu, Wu (Hao), and Sun. All of the former, in turn, trace their historical origins to Chen Village.

T’ai chi ch’uan has been reported as being useful in treating a number of human ailments, and is supported by a number of associations, including the National Parkinson Foundation and Diabetes Australia. However, medical evidence of effectiveness was lacking and in recent years research has been undertaken to address this.[31][32]

A 2011 comprehensive overview of all the existing systematic reviews of t’ai chi ch’uan’s health effects found that “the evidence is conclusively or tentatively positive for fall prevention, general healthcare in older people, improving balance and enhancing psychological health”; the overview’s authors thus recommended t’ai chi ch’uan to older people for its various physical and psychological benefits. There was no conclusive evidence of benefit for any of the other conditions researched, including Parkinson’s disease, diabetes, cancer and arthritis.[31]

A 2015 systematic review found Tai Chi could be performed by those with chronic medical conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart failure, and osteoarthritis without worsening shortness of breath and pain, and found favorable effects on functional exercise capacity in people with these conditions.[33]

In 2015 the Australian Government’s Department of Health published the results of a review of alternative therapies that sought to determine if any were suitable for being covered by health insurance; t’ai chi was one of 17 therapies evaluated for which no clear evidence of effectiveness was found.[32]

T’ai chi ch’uan or tàijíquán Tai Chi is ancient practice proven to reduce pain and improve your mental and physical well-being.  This class will help participants reduce stress, increase balance and flexibility, feel relaxed and improve overall mind, body, and spirit. is an internal Chinese martial art originally meant for defense training but now practiced for its health benefits. Conventional medical science on the Chinese art of Tai Chi now shows what Tai Chi masters have known for centuries: regular practice leads to more vigor and flexibility, better balance and mobility, and a sense of well-being. Cutting-edge research from Harvard Medical School also supports the long-standing claims that Tai Chi also has a beneficial impact on the health of the heart, bones, nerves and muscles, immune system, and the mind. This research provides fascinating insight into the underlying physiological mechanisms that explain how Tai Chi actually works.

A 2011 comprehensive overview of all the existing systematic reviews of t’ai chi ch’uan’s health effects found that “the evidence is conclusively or tentatively positive for fall prevention, general healthcare in older people, improving balance and enhancing psychological health”; the overview’s authors thus recommended t’ai chi ch’uan to older people for its various physical and psychological benefits. A 2015 systematic review found Tai Chi could be performed by those with chronic medical conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart failure, and osteoarthritis without worsening shortness of breath and pain, and found favorable effects on functional exercise capacity in people with these conditions.[33]

Today, t’ai chi ch’uan has spread worldwide. Most modern styles of t’ai chi ch’uan trace their development to at least one of the five traditional schools: Chen, Yang, Wu, Wu (Hao), and Sun. All of the former, in turn, trace their historical origins to Chen Village.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tai_chi

 

Yang Style Taijiquan is

 

http://www.shentaijiwushu.com/

http://www.yangfamilytaichi.com/association/

http://yangfamilytaichi.com/about/benefits/

 

Advertisements